You are correct.

In the meantime, John Steele discovered a new concept of judicial masturbation: a one-party lawsuit. Seriously. We all know how Prenda crooks have been doing a hard work of depriving people a say in the court, the very people they rape (again, in a judicial sense). First, scam artists argued that since subpoena is issued to an ISP, John and Jane Does have no standing to quash it. Didn’t work. Then a new trick was pulled out of the bag: to issue a subpoena not from a jurisdiction where a lawsuit is filed — with a sole goal to confuse John and Jane Does, as well as judges, making it unclear what court they should file their motions to quash with. Admonished by a couple of judges, trolls did not give up and came up with a concept of “co-conspirators” (not defendants — no standing), masking a mass shakedown lawsuits as single-defendant ones… If only this creativity was used to serve the society, not to rob it!

As the culmination of this crookery, John Steele (using an East Coast goon Daniel Ruggiero as a mouthpiece) declared that the sole defendant he is suing had no standing. I’m not joking.

This mind-bogging event happened in a federal case Guava v. John Doe (12-cv-11880) in Massachusetts. I wrote about this bad faith case recently in the post that dealt with the first powerful defense against the series of vindictive and vexatious lawsuits filed on behalf of a non-existent company “Guava LLC.” Two of our favorite attorneys, Dan Booth and Jason Sweet, have delivered a blow to Steele’s megalomaniacal march of naked kings. Defense asked the court to award fees for the prior action (an ongoing fraud in the IL Cook County court) before proceeding any further in this instant lawsuit.

Steele replied. As a rule of thumb, the more serious is a blow, the more hysterical is the reply (the most spiteful example is a sheer hysteria resulted from Erin Russell’s damage to what Prenda hoped to be a smooth extortion campaign). Steele asserted not only that the defendant in this case was not a defendant in the previous action, but also that the defendant in this case is not a defendant in this case (emphasis is mine):

Movants’ second critical flaw is that they¹ are not even defendants in this instant action. Plaintiff brought this action against an unknown defendant — John Doe. (ECF No. 1.) Plaintiff plans on amending its complaint to name and serve an actual defendant in this action, but until that time, the only party to this litigation is Plaintiff. Again, a defendant is defined as “a person sued is a civil proceeding or accused in a criminal proceeding” Black’s Law Dictionary (9th ed. 2009). Movants’ claims that they are defendants in this action are premature, as they may never be named and served in this case. […] At that point, and only at that point, will Plaintiff take that information provided by the ISP, perform a further investigation, and decide whom (and if) to name as the Defendant in this suit, and amend the Complaint accordingly. Until that time, there is no identified Defendant in this action.

Daniel Booth’s reply was, as usual, simple and elegant: No defendant? No lawsuit!

Plaintiff’s solitary version of litigation has no place in the federal courts. As Plaintiff conceded in the prior action, “courts only have subject matter jurisdiction over justiciable matters, which are matters in controversy between an actual plaintiff and an actual defendant.” […] The Court should order Plaintiff to show cause why its one-party suit should not be dismissed.

It is unrealistic to expect anything but lies from Prenda. If, hypothetically, Steele decided to tell the truth just once, he must declare that this lawsuit not only lacks a defendant, but also a plaintiff (Guava LLC is a fake business that is not registered anywhere in the world: I challenge anyone to find such registration). Judicial celibacy would ensue.

Update
Media coverage

 


¹ You are probably confused: first it was a single defendant, now he or she is referred to as “they.” The reason is that the complaint asserts a single defendant who allegedly used three IP addresses. As the defense noticed, it is simply impossible that those IP addresses could belong to a single individual: those IP addresses resolve to different cities and even different ISPs. Double vision, triple vision… It’s not a secret that John Steele has a drinking problem, but I did not know that John is already reached the delirium tremens phase.

Comments
  1. Raul says:

    It is astounding that the handful of rapidly expiring (or expired) Guava lawsuits is generating some Doe discomfort especially now that it will be, hopefully, relieved by pointing to the inanity of it all.

  2. John Balls says:

    I troll the troll John Steele. To my recent email about this tweet (NSFW) https://twitter.com/gaialovescock/status/292472753456566272 he replied:

    As always, too busy making money and having fun to take you seriously. Colorado $prings is due to the idiots as I write this. Go to bed, the adults are having fun! I got a lot of money that says the person I’m with tonight tops yours (Actual woman, you JOP).

    FYI: Jerk Off Pro

    I hope his wife will read it eventually. I’m gonna forward it to to her once I find her email.

  3. Anonymous says:

    i am pretty sure there was another case that someone posted on twitter or linked (i am too lazy to look for it) that was just a 1 page document from a different case that just said the only party in that case was the plaintiff. so they are pulling this crap in more than 1 case.

    • SJD says:

      Oh yeah, I don’t doubt it. Yet, to the best of my knowledge, no one debunked this type of douchebaggery as simply and elegantly as Booth Sweet.

  4. TrollOffaCliff says:

    I honestly don’t know how I entertained myself at work before I came to know John Steele and his merry band of legal beagles.

  5. CTVic says:

    This is a continuation of the theme started by Gibbs that the defendants are imaginary entities, when he tried saying that Morgan Pietz wasn’t representing anybody ‘real’ in Ingenuity 13 v Doe. It’s mind boggling … like an employee saying they don’t need to show up to work because there’s no work to be done, but still demanding to be paid. Easy fix – fire the employee.
    Easy fix for this: no defendant = no conflict = no case. Dismiss it and smack the plaintiff for wasting the court’s time.

  6. […] How do you call a lovemaking act without a partner? […]

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